Chantry Road (pt 1)

A short bus-ride from Birmingham City Centre, in the small suburb of Moseley, a crescent-shaped, tree-lined street of Victorian and Edwardian semis (and a few slightly more modern structures) scales the north side of a private park. Chantry Road was cut in 1890, and it has been a desirable (but not ostentatious) loop ever since, with the right mix of beautiful original architecture, careful road-care and some of Birmingham’s most coveted gardens. It’s also the place that we proudly call home.

Project

Rear extension of a Victorian Semi

Client

Us. It’s our house.

What We Did

Designed an built an extended kitchen and dining area in our forever home.

A note from the architect.

After studying the local neighbourhood plan, visiting the property to investigate potential restrictions and, of course, having a lengthy consult with the client for clarity on the space’s purpose, It was clear that Nick and Catherine wanted a space that people would instantly fall in love with. This wasn’t just a bolt-on to a period semi, this was to be a well-appointed showpiece – something truly interesting and special. The key concern here was to make clear distinction between the traditional part of the house, and the modern. The way that we did this, was to create a clean, defined break with a sharp change in materials and style, then add a few traditional nods. Another main objective was to try and get the elevation right, ensuring sufficient light. Most importantly though, we had to make the space practical and maximise utility – It’s a family home after all, and the kitchen diner is a key communal space. – Alistair Riley

A note from the designer.

The central feature here is the kitchen-island, with large format seamless silestone worktop. This forms the hub of the space and acts as a versatile focal point for entertaining, breakfast cereal, martinis etc. The solid matt-black steel-cage ceiling lights sit above the island, and contrast to the traditional lighting used in the existing house. Bespoke banquette seating runs as a continuation of the kitchen wall units. The Large dining table with feature artwork creates a space suitable for everything from family dinners to homework.

Regarding colours, materials, fixtures and fittings: The large format concrete effect floor tiles differentiate the modern extension from the traditional house, and the wooden slat wall panels soften the minimalist material palette and improve the acoustics of the space. Electric blue was chosen to run through the space, complimenting the dark kitchen, concrete and exposed red brick of the existing facade.

Feature island with large format seamless silestone worktop forms the central hub of the space.
Solid matt black steel cage ceiling lights sit above the island contrasts with the traditional lighting used in the existing house and sets a more modern tone.
Bespoke banquette seating continues the kitchen wall units, while the large dining table with feature artwork creates a space suitable for family dinners and homework.
Large format concrete effect floor tiles differentiate the modern extension from the traditional house.
Wooden slatted wall panels soften the minimalist material palette and improve the acoustic quality of the space.
Singular colour (electric blue) was chosen to run through the space. This compliments the dark kitchen, concrete and exposed red brick of the existing facade.
Frameless plastered in spotlights keep the ceiling as clutter free as possible to give attention to dramatic roof-lights.